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I.Y.H.R.F.24.7.365
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What would such a car bring to the table? Something no one wants to eat, other than a few Green New Deal commuters. The Arlington, TX GM plant has 3 shifts working at full capacity just to keep up with the demand for large GM SUVs. And when you think about it, 21st century cars actually perform better and get substantially better mileage than their 1980's counterparts. Example; compare a mid 80s Z28 Camaro and, say, a 2015 Z28 Camaro. One gets 15mpg highway on a good day and runs mid 15's; the other, 25mpg or so highway and runs mid 12s. Or a 4600 pound luxury 4 door that runs mid-11s right off the showroom floor and returns 23-24mpg out on the road - my Charger. The big downside to all the safety/environmental equipment is cost.
When a hybrid today gets 40-42 mpg, and a 1992 civic got mid 40's and a vw rabbit or golf/metro etc got almost 50.
ya.
for a daily. These would work today.
why people buy trucks. because the trucks and suv's are sold with 0.0% for 72 months.
or lease deals.
and the mid sized cars/sedans don't/didn't.
Why does the best selling vehicle 36 years running HAVE to offer 0.0% for 72 to move them?
Cuz it makes people THINK they are getting a deal. when the loan interest amount is already bured in the unit price.
They'll by a 55-60k truck when offered 0.0% for 72
over a 33k car with a 2.9%
I have old cars and trucks, and a new ranger, I'd buy a light cheap econobox. if built like the late 80's early 90's where, light and simple.
But no one wants to buy the econoboxs that are sold now for 11-15k that the oems tried to put as much features in to it. buyers know that = cheap and most likely things will fail.
I don't need the jeep g/c as a daily. But I got it, because of the price. 99% of the time it is just me in it. on the road odd hours. a small econobox would do just fine.
If I want to feel v8 power, I can drive the c-10 or cutlass or SS.
 

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I had a 2015 Ford Fusion SE Hybrid. It was a fantastic car that averaged 43.2 MPG over its 136,231 miles of it's life. Tires, oil, fluid changes were the only service ever done to it.
Serious question: was it a EcoBoost Hybrid?

Reason for Q is we dumped wife's former '15 Eco Fusion SE @ 48,000 miles due to 2nd Turbo Failure...among long list of prior under warranty issues.

.02
 

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Just wait till those free charging stations are no longer free. Another issue I see is people leaving their car at the charging station all day while they are at work, stopping anyone else who needs to use it. They just arent very practical, I dont think they will ever be. Someone did a breakdown on the cost of the electricity they use, to mpg, a lot of people dont take that into account.
 

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I bought a Tesla model 3 this year, its an awesome car. I have a ~25 mile round trip to work and my employer installed free charging for us. I havent been to a gas station in over 6 months. It's perfect for what I use it for, has autopilot, it's fast, and has all kind of bells and whistles.

All that said - I dont think Im keeping it past warranty if I can help it.
That employer-provided charging station is just one of the many unresolved tax issues around electrics. Employer-funded perks such as that are taxed based upon the "value", not necessarily the cost, in many instances. If your employer provided "free" gas, up to 5000 miles per year, for example, you would be forced to pay tax, at minimum, on what it costs to drive 5000 miles at the federal corporate average fuel economy rate, and possibly at the fuel consumption rate of your vehicle. "Free" electric charging has not been challenged by the IRS, but it will be at some point, just as the issue of road taxes have yet to be ironed out. Gas vehicle owners pay at the pump. Applying a road use tax at the charging station is in the future, eventually. Then there is the charging infrastructure, and attendant costs.
Auto makers cannot own gas stations or oil companies, under US federal combine legislation. That Tesla's charging stations are for Tesla cars only, is a grey issue there. At some point, there needs to be a industry standard charging outlet and cord end. Add to that, the cost of a gas pump. My bit of research says a new gas pump costs roughly $30K, on top of the everything else that goes with a regular gas station. A Tesla charging station costs $40k, plus attending (land, pavement, substation sometimes). That $30K gas pump can generally generate 4 times the revenue in any given time period that the charging station can. If the gas pump pays for itself in 5 years, the owners of the charging station need to allocate 6 times the amount that a gas station owner allocates from every fill to achieve the same result. How much of what you pay for gas goes to just pay for the pump? These are just a few of the issues that exist but are unresolved.
 

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When they go to tax per mile system to repair roads and get the EV drivers to pay their fair share - they won’t roll back the gas tax that’s been paying the freight until now..... so gas car drivers will get hammered twice.
 

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Had the government kept their conniving asses out of the car manufacturing business electric vehicles may have had a warmer welcome. Americans don't like being told what they can wear, eat, drive etc.
 

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When a hybrid today gets 40-42 mpg, and a 1992 civic got mid 40's and a vw rabbit or golf/metro etc got almost 50.
ya.
for a daily. These would work today.
why people buy trucks. because the trucks and suv's are sold with 0.0% for 72 months.
or lease deals.
and the mid sized cars/sedans don't/didn't.
Why does the best selling vehicle 36 years running HAVE to offer 0.0% for 72 to move them?
Cuz it makes people THINK they are getting a deal.
There's some exceptions; the two cars you mentioned are a couple. And you're correct about the 0.0 percent interest. Just another way to market them. Same deal with rebates, which is primarily a tool to please the lending institutions. Anyone with a pulse knows the 'rebate' is built into the MSRP but dealers can show it as a 'down payment', which apparently fools the banks' bean counters into believing the customer has some skin in the game.

Most any Ford house will sell you a new F150 for true dealer cost if you push them. Holdback and all. They'll starve their new-car salesmen to death just to put a number on the board. Those places survive on the back end of the deal (extended warranties, financing, accessories, etc.) and in the back end of the dealership) (service, parts, body shop) and of course, the trade-in if one is involved.
 

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Political agenda / social engineering designed to push a life style onto you. The result is predetermined, how it arrives is a question. Better grab up some modern muscle cars / charger/challenger/camaro/ mustang even though some are butt ugly, better than nothing at all.
 

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That employer-provided charging station is just one of the many unresolved tax issues around electrics. Employer-funded perks such as that are taxed based upon the "value", not necessarily the cost, in many instances. If your employer provided "free" gas, up to 5000 miles per year, for example, you would be forced to pay tax, at minimum, on what it costs to drive 5000 miles at the federal corporate average fuel economy rate, and possibly at the fuel consumption rate of your vehicle. "Free" electric charging has not been challenged by the IRS, but it will be at some point, just as the issue of road taxes have yet to be ironed out. Gas vehicle owners pay at the pump. Applying a road use tax at the charging station is in the future, eventually. Then there is the charging infrastructure, and attendant costs.
Auto makers cannot own gas stations or oil companies, under US federal combine legislation. That Tesla's charging stations are for Tesla cars only, is a grey issue there. At some point, there needs to be a industry standard charging outlet and cord end. Add to that, the cost of a gas pump. My bit of research says a new gas pump costs roughly $30K, on top of the everything else that goes with a regular gas station. A Tesla charging station costs $40k, plus attending (land, pavement, substation sometimes). That $30K gas pump can generally generate 4 times the revenue in any given time period that the charging station can. If the gas pump pays for itself in 5 years, the owners of the charging station need to allocate 6 times the amount that a gas station owner allocates from every fill to achieve the same result. How much of what you pay for gas goes to just pay for the pump? These are just a few of the issues that exist but are unresolved.

I'm not sure any of the "unresolved issues" is actually an issue. There doesn't ever have to be a standard plug or end, Tesla provides adapters for other chargers and right now - electric charging is a completely separate paradigm from gas stations, there is no land or lot, and there doesn't need to be. Stores and companies WANT chargers and superchargers in their public areas near stores and malls, yes - they want them there - there is no "attendant" or any real correlation with a gas station.

The law that prevents auto makers from owning gas stations or oil companies (never heard of that before) is also irrelevant because Tesla doesn't own the electric grid or any power stations. You seem be be making more out of plugging a car in than needs to be.
 

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I.Y.H.R.F.24.7.365
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I'm not sure any of the "unresolved issues" is actually an issue. There doesn't ever have to be a standard plug or end, Tesla provides adapters for other chargers and right now - electric charging is a completely separate paradigm from gas stations, there is no land or lot, and there doesn't need to be. Stores and companies WANT chargers and superchargers in their public areas near stores and malls, yes - they want them there - there is no "attendant" or any real correlation with a gas station.

The law that prevents auto makers from owning gas stations or oil companies (never heard of that before) is also irrelevant because Tesla doesn't own the electric grid or any power stations. You seem be be making more out of plugging a car in than needs to be.
So you are claiming that the ev while being charge hovers in the air, and not taking up space on a parking lot?
land is taxed, someone owns it, and the charging station company is paying rent to have it there.
ev's pay zero in road taxes to fund fixing the roads/bridges they use/drive on.
G.m. can not buy up a bunch of gas stations and give special gas prices to g.m. vehicle owners, but tesla gets too.
An ev doesn't charge in 5 minutes, so it is taking up a parking spot for hours. if the charger is at a mall. the parking space is for shoppers.
not some dude in the car scrolling his phone. or working on his laptop.

Come on, your ev bias is showing.
When I buy gas, no one but me is paying for it. when you charge your ev everyone in the area with an electric bill is footing part of the bill.
The person with the ev isn't getting charged the peak kilwatt hour rates, or the overuse of electric power fee, charge, etc.
Whole everyone, an ev or not will be paying for the grid updates to feed /supple your cars fuel.
 

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This reminds me of all the negative comments when index bike shifting first came out. Gas is gonna run out at some point. Probably not in our life times, but eventually. Right now EV looks like the best replacement. Maybe the technology to extract gas from the air or fuel cells will work out, but EV is ahead now. EV sucks for road racing, but for drag racing, seems like it has potential.
 

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Great. but what was the hybrid tax (cost difference) between it and the gas only model.
hybrids buy in over the gas only is to high when most buyers are trading them off in 4-5 years or less.
I'd love to see what mpg vehicles could get if the safety nazi's reg's could be axed.
I mean an 80's vw rabbit got 43+ mpg. so did the civic /etc.
hell my 84 fiero got 39.8mpg
What would an 2100 lb car with a 1 ltrer or smaller turbo'd today get with the extra gears and low end torque that the turbo brings to the table.
without the cost of all the hybrid crap.

Sadly we'll never know, as the highway safety dept. would never allow it to be built , or if it was, never allow it for sale on our roads.
Cars are many many times more safe today! do you want to get in a 80's vw on the interstate in todays world?
 
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