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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello to everyone that visits this post. I'm looking to do some research and build my level of knowledge on what it takes to build a reliable, race-ready, high-RPM small displacement V8 for spec racing, and I'm hoping that others on this forum will be able to help me figure out the small details. I'm aiming for an engine that's going to be spending most of its operating life north of 6500 RPM, and top out at, or just short of 9,000 RPM (max RPM limit for the class). I'm not looking to go into NASCAR territory, but the more RPM I can turn reliably, the more horsepower I'll make. Before commenting, please keep in mind that I do fully understand the financial undertaking this is, and I don't take this lightly. Also, I'm planning on running it at or around 91/93 octane fuel, maybe move up to VP T4 if I'm feeling froggy.

Quick little side note: the specifics of the car this is going into isn't important right now. By the time I'm done with it it won't be resembling anything close to stock.

Here's what I know so far:
Custom solid roller large-diameter core camshaft (4-7 swap) with at least 280 degree duration and close to .900" lift at the valves (for intake and exhaust). The reason for the swap is to move the 'hot spot' of the engine form the back of the block to the front, where the coldest coolant is.
Upgrade to .907" solid lifters
either dedicated 18 degree Aluminum cylinder heads or find a source for SB2/SB2.2 heads to match projected airflow numbers
A shaft rocker system
high-pressure springs (probably close to 1000lb on the nose... but not entirely sure yet)
Titanium or Tool-steel retainers
a custom fully-balanced knife-edged crankshaft (most likely from Callies or Crower) balanced to within .1 grams
Titanium valves
An engine block utilizing a priority main oiling system, 4-bolt splayed caps, and (in the case of SB2/2.2 heads) offset lifter bores
A fully engineered dry-sump oiling system; most likely from Dailey Engineering (do I also need a vacuum pump in addition to the dry-sump system?)
Forged Aluminum Connecting rods (or do I have to go billet?)
Custom pistons with deep valve reliefs
Crank-trigger ignition system with coil-per-plug setup
lightweight flywheel
a single plane intake with a throttle body (carburetor rated at or greater than 1100 CFM)

But this is where my knowledge falls short, and my questions begin. Questions such as:

Where do I go to get a block with offset lifter bores (if using the sb2 heads)? Also, just in general, what block should I be looking to use for this (keep in mind that I'm only perusing the aftermarket for this. I'm not taking a chance on a used un-purposed block)
If I'm going to go for an 18 degree cylinder head, which one should I look for? Any suggestions? I would prefer ones that are designed around a dedicated shaft rocker system.
Which manufacturer should I go to for shaft rockers? And what ratio should I be looking to get?
What rod journal diameter should I go for? Also, can someone explain why having a smaller rod journal diameter is used? Is it better than a larger one? Why?
Who do I go to for titanium valves and retainers?
Where should I get heads such as these machined? Any good shops in the lower 48?
What sort of manual transmission should I look to use? Also, what does faceplating a transmission mean? Is that something I should look into? Will a 4 speed be better or should I look for a transmission with more gears?
Is it actually better to have a crank-trigger system instead of a distributor style? If that's the case, does anyone have any suggestions as to what system to look for?
What electronics package should I look to go for, and how do I make all the individual pieces work together?
Anyone have any recommendations for ring packs? End-gap suggestions? I know there's a thumbrule somewhere but I can't remember what it is...
What else am I forgetting? I know there's got to be something I'm not thinking of...

Again, any input is greatly appreciated.

Hope y'all have a good one.

Jace
 

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Your post make you sound like a kid in the basement reading too many magazines (or online articles.... god I'm getting old).
1) Its GOOD that you are reading all this stuff. Your just getting a bit confused. Build a motor first, any motor.
2) If you really want to get into road racing consider this:
a) Get a race car. The cheapest way to get into real racing is carting. Couple of $1Ks and you can get a competitive. There are places you can rent them. Top shifter carts can do 120+mph.... and you will be about 2" above the road.
The same places will typically have lessons as well. Locally a place gives 2 x 4hr leasons and you get a driver's suit and a helmet out of the deal.
b) Go road racing with your street car. Get a fox body mustang or 3rd gen camaro with a manual trans, decent tires and make sure the brakes are 100% and go to open track events/scchools/training. If you have a bit more money, a C6 corvette, with a 6 speed can be a lot of fun for under $20K

Spend your money improving a and b.
Car first, engine last.

If you want to go racing in a class, its going to cost lots of money.
1) Get a rule book. Some classes require you to declare horsepower (with a dyno sheet) and add weight to match. In that case build a torq motor and the lightest car you can. It takes power to stop and turn a car as well - light is better. If you are really into one type of racing, you might find it interesting to buy the rule book anyway. Lots of weird stuff in rule books - either to make the class more competitive or to keep people from dying.
2) Find a forum that is dedicated to that kind of racing. This is not it.
3) Find an engine builder that others use to build for that class. Have him build you a 'competitive' motor. For normal performance motors, by the time you get all the maching done, assembling the motor is relatively cheap.
4) Understand that nothing you think of for engine building hasn't been tried by someone else. In road racing its a package deal with the two biggest factors the driver and the tires followed by the chassis setup. BTW, $4k for shocks is very easy number to reach.

Lets try this: Assuming a bsfc (Brake Specific Fuel Consumption) of about .4 (.4 gallons of fuel to make 1hp for 1hr - which is really good for pump gas) and an air/fuel ration of 13:1, a 302 spinning at 9000 rpm will pump 780 cubic feet in a minute, or 47000 cubic feet in an hour.
With air density of 0.074887 lbs/cubic ft, that means your going to put 3530 lbs of air through the motor. A/F ratio of 13:1, that means about 272 lbs of fuel. BSFC of .4 means just over 675hp. That's assuming 100% V.E.
Nothing exotic needed. Don't think you even need SB2 heads (not until your at 800hp or so).
Rule of thumb 1/2 cfm air flow for every hp (V-8). So 340 cfm heads would be enough. That's off the shelf stuff.

BTW, do you know they also make titanium connecting rods?

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Your post make you sound like a kid in the basement reading too many magazines (or online articles.... god I'm getting old).
1) Its GOOD that you are reading all this stuff. Your just getting a bit confused. Build a motor first, any motor.
2) If you really want to get into road racing consider this:
a) Get a race car. The cheapest way to get into real racing is carting. Couple of $1Ks and you can get a competitive. There are places you can rent them. Top shifter carts can do 120+mph.... and you will be about 2" above the road.
The same places will typically have lessons as well. Locally a place gives 2 x 4hr leasons and you get a driver's suit and a helmet out of the deal.
b) Go road racing with your street car. Get a fox body mustang or 3rd gen camaro with a manual trans, decent tires and make sure the brakes are 100% and go to open track events/scchools/training. If you have a bit more money, a C6 corvette, with a 6 speed can be a lot of fun for under $20K

Spend your money improving a and b.
Car first, engine last.

If you want to go racing in a class, its going to cost lots of money.
1) Get a rule book. Some classes require you to declare horsepower (with a dyno sheet) and add weight to match. In that case build a torq motor and the lightest car you can. It takes power to stop and turn a car as well - light is better. If you are really into one type of racing, you might find it interesting to buy the rule book anyway. Lots of weird stuff in rule books - either to make the class more competitive or to keep people from dying.
2) Find a forum that is dedicated to that kind of racing. This is not it.
3) Find an engine builder that others use to build for that class. Have him build you a 'competitive' motor. For normal performance motors, by the time you get all the maching done, assembling the motor is relatively cheap.
4) Understand that nothing you think of for engine building hasn't been tried by someone else. In road racing its a package deal with the two biggest factors the driver and the tires followed by the chassis setup. BTW, $4k for shocks is very easy number to reach.

Lets try this: Assuming a bsfc (Brake Specific Fuel Consumption) of about .4 (.4 gallons of fuel to make 1hp for 1hr - which is really good for pump gas) and an air/fuel ration of 13:1, a 302 spinning at 9000 rpm will pump 780 cubic feet in a minute, or 47000 cubic feet in an hour.
With air density of 0.074887 lbs/cubic ft, that means your going to put 3530 lbs of air through the motor. A/F ratio of 13:1, that means about 272 lbs of fuel. BSFC of .4 means just over 675hp. That's assuming 100% V.E.
Nothing exotic needed. Don't think you even need SB2 heads (not until your at 800hp or so).
Rule of thumb 1/2 cfm air flow for every hp (V-8). So 340 cfm heads would be enough. That's off the shelf stuff.

BTW, do you know they also make titanium connecting rods?

Good luck.
Indeed I was aware that Titanium Connecting rods are a thing. However, doing a cost-benefit analysis between that and forged 4340 steel, I can't justify spending that kind of money on parts that are not only going to fatigue and fail at some point (they will need replacement somewhere down the line), but at my power level, they just won't make enough of a difference. I'm not spinning to astronomical RPM, and even if I was, I'm thinking that it's more a question of valvetrain stability than an ultra lightweight bottom end.

But again, new question. SInce it's obvious that I don't need SB2 heads, is it worth it for me to go to low-degree aftermarket heads or should I stay with a more classical 23 degree configuration. While I have no issue working with 23 degree heads, the change in valve degree (by making it more steep) has to be for something, right?
 
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