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Discussion Starter #41
It has been a busy winter with a bunch of things going on with the car, and I am finally wrapping things up.

The idea of relocating the battery to the trunk became more involved due to me wanting to rewire a number of things and incorporate all of that into the battery relocation and kill switch. Just easier to do it all at once. Some of this rewiring was partly due to the addition of gauges and other stuff since the build started a number years ago. The goal was to make everything nice and neat and easy to trace for adding things and debugging if needed.


I wanted to make sure that I met the NHRA rules for a trunk battery / kill switch that kills all power from the battery and stops the engine. I took it to the point making sure absolutely all battery power does not leave the trunk when the disconnect switch is pushed, along with stopping the engine:
1. A Moroso Super Duty Battery Disconnect Switch, 74102, a dual switch was used to kill the power to the trunk starter solenoid and a continuous relay for any other power- see below.


2. A Ford relay is used for the big starter cable (1/0 welding cable) and that cable is only HOT when cranking. After looking at a number of paths to run this cable, under the car was not possible with out lots of drilling and wandering around due to the frame reinforcements and outriggers. The cable runs from the trunk, inside over the right wheel well where it enters the interior behind the door, then along the bottom of the door sill, finally exiting through the floor kick area and right to the starter. This wire is encased in nylon braid, and any areas where there is the possibility of rubbing, grommets AND fiberglass sheathing is used, such as where it passes through the floor and where the cable enters the interior. The small section (about 14") from the floor to the starter is encased in DEI ultra sheath high temp tubing to protect it from the headers, and a small bracket holds it close to the block.

3. A continuous relay (Painless Performance High Amp Shut Down Relay 50105) is used to switch all main power from the trunk as well as the alternator charge line. It is turned on/off with the kill switch. Only issue with this is that if left on for an extended period of time it will drain the battery. In my new dash panel I have an indicator LED to remind me to push the switch when I park it- More on that when I write up the new switch panel, and gauge setup.

4. In the trunk there is a ground stud welded to the frame and roll bar plate as a common point for the battery and an additional dedicated ground cable that goes to a stud in the engine bay.



5. Like the starter cable, all wires from the trunk including: Main Power 8GA, dedicated MSD Box Power 8GA, a dedicated ground (8GA from the battery to the engine bay GND stud), starter solenoid (S-term) control wire, and Fuel pump power (from interior Relay Panel) are all encased in flexible nylon braid and ran inside the door sill tray.



6. For the MSD box power I ran a separate 8GA wire (GREEN), to a lug in the engine bay, and a second 8AWG (RED) to another stud for the main power.



7. There is a Maxi fuse for the MSD and Main PWR harness in the trunk, and being overly cautious, I also have another maxi fuse in the engine bay on the alternator charge wire, so that link is protected at both power sources (BAT and ALT).

8. In addition to breaking the ALT charge line and to minimize toasting the alternator, the kill switch also kills the ignition box through a relay on the relay panel. The tech inspectors always test this to make sure the engine stops, so it will get used.

9. I looked at a number is places to locate the Push off handle and decided to exit the rear panel so it is easy seen if it is ever needed.. It goes right through the rear honeycomb panel and fits right in one of the indents, so it can be easily put back to stock with epoxy.



Side notes:
1. An Optima Redtop is stuffed in the box.
2. Some massaging of the rear wheel well was required since the battery box barely fit because of the roll bar. I had to get creative with how I put the battery in the box.
3. For 8GA and thicker cables, I used a 10 Ton hydraulic crimper (recommended on here recently by others) which did a great job and every terminal used heat shrink tubing with adhesive inside for added reliability.

Here is a teaser on the relay panel when I first started building it. It is now mounted under the dash on the passenger kick area and is mostly wired in. More on this next.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
just sent you a message.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Continuing with the electrical work I decided to organize all of my relays and other electrical stuff on a panel. The core of this panel is a Nitrous Dave 10 Circuit Relay Center with 5 fused 40 amp circuits and 5 fused 20 amp circuits. The relays are socketed and fused, as well as small LEDs on the relay trigger as well as output sides to aid in testing and knowing when a circuit is active. The panel just made it easier than using a bunch of separate relays. Right now I am not using all circuits, but expect to, as I add things such as an electric fans and water pump in the future. There are 3 stand alone relays in the upper right that are used due to needed flexibility that the panel did not allow. One is for killing the ignition box that works in conjunction with the trunk kill switch, and the other two are part of the latching circuit for the 2-step and line lock released by the clutch pedal switch.



All wires are high quality TXL or GLX Automotive wire and every terminal is crimped and soldered, with adhesive lined heat shrink tubing for added reliability. I picked up a Dymo Rhimo 4200 label printer that would print on heat shrink tubing so every wire is labeled on both ends, as well as some along the way for easy identification. Labels and wire colors match the schematics I put together so in a year when old age kicks in and I completely forgot what I did, I can figure it out :) Its hard to see under the wires, but all of the terminal strips have labels on the board as well.



Mounted the panel on the passengers side kick area with 4 nutcerts in the floor for easy removal and there is enough slack in the harness that I can move the entire board out onto the floor for additional access if needed.

There were two concerns that I needed to address with the location. First was a passenger kicking the panel, and second was a heater core leak dripping water on the panel (yes these old stangs are known for that). To address both I fabbed a 2 piece Lexan panel that covers it and wraps right to the floor panel. It will do a decent job for protection. It can quickly be removed with 4 twist knobs.




Next working on wrapping up the custom switch panel for the dash and Racepak IQ3 display dash.
 

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Seems like most 69/70's I have seen that retain a stock look and do not go on a serious diet are 3500 to 3600lbs.
Very nice on that Fox, and it should be a screamer with that weight and HP. Good luck.
Hmmmmmmm.... Mine is full interior, stock steel hood, cage, and really no attempt to make it lighter, and my race weight is 3380 lbs, with me in the car at 210 lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Hmmmmmmm.... Mine is full interior, stock steel hood, cage, and really no attempt to make it lighter, and my race weight is 3380 lbs, with me in the car at 210 lbs.
That is really good. I do know the 70's weight a bit more that a 69, due to the side rocker moldings, but yours is 200lbs lighter than mine. Do you have any chassis stiffening, such as subframe connectors which would add weight?

Rms8, thanks for the complement.
 

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My 67 with 351C, T5, 9", frame connectors, 4 point roll bar, fiberglass hood, Shelby deck lid, and lower side scoops, 1/4 tank of gas weighed 3110.
 

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That is really good. I do know the 70's weight a bit more that a 69, due to the side rocker moldings, but yours is 200lbs lighter than mine. Do you have any chassis stiffening, such as subframe connectors which would add weight?

Rms8, thanks for the complement.
Subframe connectors, and a cage.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
Finally wrapped up the wiring.

If you look at some of my earlier interior pics when I first started the build a few years ago, I had a number of gauges inside of my console box and in the front area of the console with a dual gauge pod. The console box also had some switches to enable to line loc, 2-step, and start the data logger. With the install of the GForce race transmission last fall and the modifications of the transmission tunnel, the console no longer fit so I needed somewhere to put all of this.

I decided to use a RacePak IQ3 display dash that works with my Sportsman data logger. This way I can have all gauges (up to 28 inputs) in one display with multiple pages. Some of the things that are monitored (and or logged) include: RPM, Volts, A/F, Drive shaft speed, clutch slip, Water Temp, Oil Temp, Oil Pressure, Vacuum, Fuel Pressure, Acc G's, Lateral G's.

The display is attached to the steering column so I would not mess up the original dash/gauges which still function and the harness is enclosed behind the display.



For all of the switches and indicator LED'S I created a custom panel that fit right into the Air Conditioner Vent frame. I had removed the AC a year ago, so the vent was not being used and only for looks.

Left Panel:
Switches left to right in order that they would be activated as I stage: Enable Line Loc, Start Data logging, Enable 2-Step. I also selected different switch types so I could feel the difference.
Leds: Amber/Engaged = Line Loc actually engaged when the shifter button is pressed, Blue=2-Step Active. Note that when staged, the LineLoc and 2-step are released off of the clutch pedal switch.
Right Panel:
Leds: Green= Battery Kill switch active, RED= Programmable Warning from IQ3,
Switches: IQ3 button 1 and 2

I removed the adjustable air direction vents and created 2 panels that would snap in. The panels are made out of sintra, which is durable, yet easy to drill and form.


To create the panel image, generated some artwork to exact scale so I could locate the switches and LEDs and create a visual mockup.


Then created an image that I could print out on photo vinyl, laminate it on the panels, drill where the + signs are and just assemble it. This included all of the logos and lettering. I also decided to give a slight carbon fiber effect in the background.
 

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Nice
 

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Discussion Starter #52
With the increase in HP/TQ last year, and the install of the GForce G101a, I was really pushing the OEM rear end housing (31 spline axles/TruTrac) and it was the weak link in the driveline. Part of this winters list of projects was to install something much stronger.

Purchased a Heavy Duty Strange Crate Rear End
Had them reinforce it with Boxed-in Spring Perches and add a back brace
Powder coated
Center section is 9" PRO IRON with a Light Weight 4.30:1 Spool
35 SPLINE Pro Race Custom axles with 5 lightening holes

According to strange, should be good for 1000HP+

The 4:30's should have me trapping at about 6800-7000rpms, right near the peak and with the 3.17 first gear, should be very quick off the line.

Took it for a quick ride before the snow and it feels great!!!




 

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Great build! Where did you get the shift boot? Is it a custom made item?
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Great build! Where did you get the shift boot? Is it a custom made item?
Thanks.

I purchased the shift boot from Summit Racing. The boot needed to be large enough to fit the large sifter attachment bracket, and flexible to wrap around the tunnel. All the others I found were too rigid at the base, not large enough.

The boot retaining trim ring is custom made out of 1/8" aluminum that I shaped to the opening.

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/sum-59101

 

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Discussion Starter #55
It was time for some new plug wires, so after reading some very good reviews on the on here, I decided to give the FireCore50 wires a shot. One thing that I really liked when I first looked at these were the long boots that they call Promod 45 Boots. With my current wires, it is a total PIA to get the wires on and off near the shock towers, and even the end ones due to the headers and the thick header flange. In the past to get the plug wires off I need to use plug wire pliers or another small tool I have, and it is still a pain.

With these extra long boots and the integral area to grab, no tools needed and I can get them more easily on and off. They are more expensive than the general ones out there, but the quality is excellent, and super fast turnaround time- less than a week to my door. I sent them my wire lengths to be custom made so they would be routed as I wanted.



They come with wire markers installed as well. The boots on both ends grab very well and a good positive click indication of them being locked on.


You can see how tight it is, and how these stick out giving something to grab onto.

 

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You can see how tight it is, and how these stick out giving something to grab onto.

[/QUOTE]
You can disconnect that harness on the shock tower. "If I remember right its for the headlights blinkers and voltage reg." And reroute it inbetween the inner and outer fenders to gain a little room. I did it on my 68 and it was pleanty long enoph.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Tony, how does it run?
Hi Rick,
I have only had it running in the garage (still winter here :) ) but so far it runs good. Local track does not open until April, but I will probably have it on the street a little prior to.

Thanks for the follow up.
Tony

[/QUOTE]
You can disconnect that harness on the shock tower. "If I remember right its for the headlights blinkers and voltage reg." And reroute it inbetween the inner and outer fenders to gain a little room. I did it on my 68 and it was pleanty long enoph.[/QUOTE]

Plumber82, The issue is not with the harness in the way since it sits up high enough-may be deceiving with the angle of the pic. It was with me getting my hands in there between the header pipes and shock tower to grab the boot with enough leverage to pull it off. That was with my old plug wires. With the Firecore ones having the long boot and that grab area, there no no issue at all. Now I may still move that harness at some point to clean the bay up, so good to know its should be long enough. Thanks
 
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