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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Date: 2-5-23

My friend Blake designed and 3D priced a cover the the boost solenoids.



He included a cut-out on the side so that I can mount a Deutsch 4 connector bulkhead fitting, instead of the two connectors that were on the solenoids before.



Both Vic and I liked the raw 3D printed look of the sides, but the top was not as pretty. So Vic applied some vinyl to the top.



The mounting plate itself is pretty thin, so in order to tap a hole for the hold down bolt, I drilled a small hole and used a punch to gradually enlarge the hole. This folds the soft aluminum out and gives more material to tap, making it as good as a captive nut.



I also made the hose that gos from the fill tank to the top of the heat exchanger.



Hear are the two heat exchanger lines where they slip between the core support and the radiator.



The hose from the bottom of the heat exchanger loops towards the fender, then comes over the fan, and then down into the top of the pump.



I also took the turbo off so that I could rattle can the turbo support bracket.



Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Date: 2-8-23

Today was another plumbing day. This time it was time to plumb the transmission cooler. Here is a little tip when working with push-lock style hose.

Add a union to the fitting and snug it down. This does two things:

1. If using a 45 or 90 degree fitting it keeps the nipple from trying to move around.



2. When putting the fitting in the vise to hold it, it keeps the the nut from crushing and becoming out of round.



This is the rear fitting on the transmission. The picture actually makes it look like there is a lot of clearance, but in reality it is very tight.



I managed to get the hose end started, but I will probably have to get creative with getting it tight. I think a Crow's foot should get it done.



The front port wasn't too bad. I used a 45 degree fitting on this hose. Removing the trans dipstick made access easier.



The hoses make a gently sweep over the bell housing area of the transmission, over to the driver's side, where they slip into a slot in the frame. This slot is where the factory hard lines were routed through the frame and out the front crossmember, by the steering box.



I also experimented with some covering material for the intercooler plumbing. This is a fabric heat shrink material.



The ends are finished with heat shrink. This is a close-up to show the pattern and texture.



Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Date: 2-11-23

This is Earl's Ultra Pro hose and it is by far the nicest hose I have ever worked with. It is super flexible, light weight, and looks fantastic. Sadly, for some reason, Earl's no longer sells this hose in sizes smaller than AN-10. I had a 6 foot section of AN-6 hose that I had purchased a while back.



So I decided to use it to make some of the needed hoses under the hood. This is the fuel rail crossover that links the two rails together in the front.



The original plan was to have the Mighty Mouse catch can mounted to the master cylinder mount. However, with the Bosch iBooster in place, that was no longer an option. I got on the MM website and saw they had a basic mount that was designed to bolt to the head.



Mounting it to the front of the heads was not an option. The passenger side has the turbo and the driver's side has the alternator. I could have modified this mount to work on the driver's side front, but instead, I chose to flip it around and mount it to the back of the driver's head.



It fit perfectly in the back.



It places it approximately in the same location as the MC mount. There is plenty of clearance all around the can and the mount.



I got this 150 degree fitting and some Earl's Ultra Pro hose in AN-10.



The hose then gently bonds to the catch can.



And in the front, it passes under the plate that holds the boost solenoids.



Lastly, this arrived.....



This is the Hardwire Electronics 25 channel PDM.



I saw these guys at the PRI show and was very intrigued by the product. This has way more channels than I need for the moment, but I may eventually have it handling the power distribution for the whole car. For now, the original harness will take care of all the interior and exterior lighting and the power windows. The Hardwire PDM will be use for the EFI, AC, and any other system under the dash.

The Hardwire PDM also supports the Holley 3rd Party CAN protocol (AKA the Racepak protocol), so I will be able to do some neat things. More to come on that much later when I start on the wiring.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Date: 2-14-23

The hood 3D scan turned out really well. I had a chance to work with Kris Horton with the tuning on his Chevelle and he has been working on a rendering of my GTO. He will use the hood scan to refine the rendering and also come up with various ideas about how to deal with the hole in the hood.



Next on the list was finding a suitable location for the Hardwire PDM. My under-dash structure is not like a typical A-body because 20 years ago a frame was built to hold the VA AC unit. Part of this fram structure was also a little shelf where the old Holley Commander 950 ECU used to live.



I figured that attaching the PDM under the shelf would be the perfect, central location.



I added some #8 rivnuts to the plate...



With the PDM bolted down in place...



It is slightly below the level of where the old ash tray used to be, but it is much more inconspicuous than what the pictures indicate. It is tucked up under the dash, while still having all of the connectors easily accessible.



More plumbing....I made the short hose that goes from the catch can to the back of the intake manifold.



Lastly, I made a short hose for the power steering pressure side.



Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Date: 2-15-23

When I originally built the car, twenty years ago, I had the foresight to install a 1/2" stainless fuel hardline that runs from the back, along the frame rail, and exits here at the front of the frame. It already had a AN-8 male fitting on the end.

I have been sourcing some of my plumbing supplies here locally from Star Performance. This PTFE hose is branded under the Red Horse brand of hoses and fittings.



Vic and I also made a little mount for the TMAP sensor that is above the Tick intercooler. This way I can datalog both air temperature and boost pressure above and below the intercooler, so I can see how well it is working.



Vic also cut out the rest of the panels to cover the firewall. I really like the overall look. It looks clean and adds a layer of heat insulations.



Back to the fuel system. I was originally going to bring the -8 hose from the frame rail, to the back of the intake and have a Y-bock and 2 -6 hoses to the rails. This was proving to be kind of a pain in the a$$, so I made my life easier...



The -8 hose from the frame rail feeds into the passenger side fuel rail.



There is a cross-over hose at the front and the rear of the driver's side fuel rail is capped off.



I also bent up a little NiCopp tube for the blow-off valve.



This is the plate that I had made earlier. These connectors will be for the injectors and coil harnesses.



Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Date: 2-18-23

With the fuel plumbing finished up under the hood, it was time to figure out what needed to be done in the back. I recently ordered some wiring supplies from www.milspecwiring.com, and as I browsed their website, I got suckered in by this little piece of jewelry. It is the Injector Dynamics ID750 fuel filter. I got mine with the optional Bosch Motorsports fuel pressure/temp sensor. The little Schrader valve port will be repurposed to plumb the pressure relief valve that was recommended by Carl at Vaporworx.



The DeatschWerks 5th Gen Camaro pump module that I am using has this alignment tab that is used in the OEM application to properly clock the pump. Since mine is going into a Rick's RestoMod tank, I did not need this tab, so it was cut off.



Once the tank was installed in the car, it was obvious that the access hole that was there before was not going to work.



I am also thinking that the fuel filter, flex fuel sensor, and the pressure relief valve will be plumbed inside the trunk. There is just not a lot of room under the car. I know it is "risky" (whatever that means) but that is how I am going to do it.



I got the whizzwheelofdeath out and made a new hole in the trunk. All of this will get cleaned up with a nice cover panel.



Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Date: 2-19-23

I don't know how I feel about this yet, but that's what I got so far.



The fuel line comes to of the pump, under the trunk floor, through a bulkhead fitting, then to the fuel filter and the flex fuel sensor holder.



The upside to this arrangement is that servicing the fuel filter, flex fuel sensor, and the wiring would be very simple and easy.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Date: 2-21-23

Today it was "drive your hotrod to work day" so I drove the Cougar to Vic's place.



I put some fabric sleeving on the fuel line that goes from the pump to the bulkhead. This is how it looks when viewed from the bottom. It looks like it is touching, but there is clearance all around that hose.



This view is from the front, looking over the top of the rear axle.



Once that was sorted, I moved to the other side where the 1/2" stainless tube terminates. The top fitting is what I had in there. It is a -AN8 to -AN6 male union.



Since the fuel like that I am using in the rear is -AN10, I needed the adapter shown at the bottom. The one that I got from Star Performance was aluminum, as they didn't have any steel ones. After discussing it with Vic, it was decided that a steel fitting would be more appropriate. So we got a -AN10, steel male weld bung, and Vic made a new fitting, using part of the old fitting.



The other thing that I decided to change was not have the flex fuel sensor holder be right after the fuel filter. Even with the filter shifted to the left as much as possible, I just don't have the linear room to mount everything and still have enough room for the hoses to routed appropriately. With the flex fuel holder gone, this is how I plan to run the hose. It will sweep gently, back under the trunk floor and turn back towards the right side, where the stainless tube is located.



The flex fuel sensor holder will be attached to the end of the tube with a -AN10 to -AN10 female union.



Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Date: 2-26-23

I got the flex fuel sensor, but of course I got the wrong one to work with the Motion Raceworks holder...



I was missing one last fitting to complete the intercooler hoses. The inlet to the intercooler needs a 45 degree fitting in order to clear the fuel rail that is below it. I used the fabric heat shrink on top of the Earl's Super Stock hose and it looks remarkably similar to the Earl's Ultra Pro hose.



This hose makes a gentle sweep down and towards the center of the fan shroud...



Where it connects to the water pump. You can see the pump mounted to the fan shroud.



Vic took a couple of fittings and welded them together to make an adapter.



The adapter is used to mount the pressure relief valve.



Carl from VaporWorx told me this was necessary to keep the system from getting vapor locked. He told me to purchase a small Radium Engineering fuel pressure regulator and send me a special 80psi diaphragm for it.

When the car has been running for a while, then it is turned off, pressure in the feed line can build up and lock up the injectors from firing. This valve will burn the feed line once the pressure exceeds 80psi.

I also got a modern Helical exhaust valve that uses a Küster 3 pin motor. This will be controlled by the Holley Dominator ECU. Not sure why the video doesn't show...Just click the link...


Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
Date: 2-28-23

Today I decided to leave the plumbing for a while and tackle one of the last big boxes that I have. As mentioned before, this car now has a complete Ridetech suspension, front and rear, and part of that package are front and rear sway bars. This is the front sway bar.



This sway bar kit is very thought out. The bushings are polyurethane, but they also include this slick Delrin bushing, which is supposed to eliminate the need for lube and is supposed to eliminate squeaks, which are so common with polyurethane bushings.



The ridge on the Delrin bushing rides inside a groove in the middle of the bushing, which keeps the bushing from sliding out.



Judging by the weight, the bar is hollow and has there bushing ends welded to both sides.



The mounting system includes some plates that move the bar about 1" forward. This is done to clear the pitman arm on the passenger side. My old swaybar used to rub a little bit against the edge of the pitman arm. You can see that now there is a solid inch of clearance.



The end links are Moog parts and also did not call for any lube.



Lastly, I also dug out the mating connectors for the bulkhead panel.



The connectors have the optional "backs" on them, so that I can fully cover the wires. The "backs" also provide addd strain relief, which is very important for all connectors.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Date: 3-7-23

With spring quickly coming, my tuning business has been picking up steam, which means less time to work on the GTO, but I managed to knock out a couple of tasks.

First up is the Ridetech rear sway bar. The kit comes with these brackets that would normally be held in place by a U-bolt. This this rear housing has a back brace, the bracket no longer fits around the axle tube. I trimmed the parts that were interfering and used an angle finder to make sure that both brackets were at the same angle. The actual angle is not critical, but having them be the same seemed pretty important.



Next, I drilled some holes in the frame for the end link brackets. This is the driver's wide.



This is the passenger side with the sway bar bracket and the end link installed.



Vic got a new MIG welded and I buggered it in place. The welds are not pretty, but they will be fine.



Lastly, fiddled around with the flex fuel sensor holder. I didn't want the sensor to just be hanging by the AN union without any support. I used a large P clamp to support the other side where the fuel line will attach.



Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Date: 3-9-23

I take inspiration from all kinds of places. A while back I ran across a build on the Rad Rides website. It was the 1961 Brookwood wagon built for George Poteet:



When I was at PRI I went to the booth of the vendor that did the cladding on the downpipe. The company is HeaderShield. I emailed them after the show, sent pictures of my parts, they gave me a quote, I paid it, sent my parts in, and ten weeks later I got them back.

This is the up-pipe that goes from the Holley manifold exit to the turbine inlet.



This is the downpipe that feeds the exhaust from the turbine, under the car.



The rest of the exhaust will take off from the downpipe.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Date: 3-10-23

I brought the pipes over to Vic's and installed them, hopefully for good. The downpipe fits great, although it is about 1/8 inch away from the frame. I am hoping the cladding will keep the powder coating on the frame from burning off.



Here is the up-pipe, going from the Hooker exhaust manifold to the turbine inlet. If you look closely, you can see the bung for the EGT probe.



Here is the wastegate plumbing. The wastegate itself will get a little blanket, as will the turbine housing. Both from Funk Motorsports in England.



Here you can see the oil drain. Remember, it is stainless steel, but I also added an insulating sleeve over the top. The EGT bung is also clearly visible.



This is just an overall shot of how things are looking.



The yellow dipstick handle needs to go...

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
The whole area behind the rear seat was covered with MLV. It was sad to have to cut into it...



But I needed access so that I could install this...

It is a OEM fuel vapor separator. I plan to vent the tank though this and then into a small charcoal canister. That should keep most of the fuel vapors at bay.



I sealed it against the body with some butyl rope.



Here you can see where the lines exit, just above the rear crossmember.



I also played around with the new gauges.



It is a little frustrating that the Holley gauges are 4" instead of 5", so something has to be done about that...The fuel lever gauge fit great into the 2 1/16" hole.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
I like to repurpose OEM parts as part of my builds. I am not sure how I ran across this part, but it is from a 2008 Ford F250 with the PowerStroke engine.



This is what Ford uses for the exhaust pressure sensor, and I figured I can use it for the same purpose. In this picture, the tube has been cut and a sleeve installed over the cut. The sleeve ends where the green tape is and where my finger is pointing.



This is the sensor part number. From what I have been able to gather, it is a 0-54psi sensor.



The tube is stainless and 5/16" diameter and it uses 37 degree flares with tube sleeves and nuts at both ends. That size tubing translates to an -AN5, which is not super common. Luckily, I had this 90 degree NPT to -AN5 adapter that I was using on the old tank for the return line. The NPT side has been cut off and Vic turned it down in the lathe to make a -AN5 male weld fitting.



Here you can see where the fitting is going to go. Yes, the first hole was way off...



The whole assembly is bolted to one of the holes on the back of the heads...



and the tube extends down to the crossover pipe...



Once the tube was the right length and clocked correctly, the sleeve was welded to the tube.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
I arrived at Vic's this morning and found that he had already stuck the stock dipstick into the lathe and got rid of the ugly yellow dipstick handle.



He also took a piece of Delrin that he had on hand and made a new new dipstick handle, which is much more appealing.



Once the parts were ready, they were cleaned and mated together with some JB Weld.



Much better...



Here it is, in case you didn't notice it.



I also mounted the AC condenser in its location and removed the protective cardboard from the radiator.



I will have the AC and the heater plumbing sorted pretty soon.

Andrew
 
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